How To Successfully Choose Brand Colours

 

How To Successfully Choose Brand Colours

 

Are you rebranding in 2019, or choosing brand colours for the first time? Here are 5 things you must consider:

 

1) What emotion will these colours evoke?

 

Every colour drives an emotional response from the viewer. Choose colours based on what you want your audience to feel when looking at your brand.

 

2) Do the colours and brand typography work together?

 

Choose colours and typography that complement each other and provide a similar emotional response.

 

3) How will the colours impact purchasing decisions?

 

Majority of purchasing decisions are based on initial judgments and colour. Make sure your colours bring buyers in quickly, and don’t scare them away.

 

4) How does this colour relate to the target audience?

 

While there are similarities in the emotions colours evoke, you can get extremely specific to your target audience and what they are drawn to.

 

5) How do the colours connect to your overall goal?

The colours you choose for your brand should enhance your overall goals and speak to your company’s message.

 

Ready for more tips and colour tool resources? Check out this article: https://www.inkondapaper.com/hidden-in-plain-sight-how-to-choose-your-brands-colors/

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Merry Christmas

Merry Christmas from Direction Printing!

 

From the entire Direction Team we wish you a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

 

Here's a tasty recipe for gingerbread cookies to bring you some holiday cheer!

 

Ingredients:
2 ¼ cups flour
½ cup white sugar
½ cup butter softened
½ cup molasses
1 egg
1 ½ tsp cinnamon
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp ground ginger
½ tsp ground cloves
½ tsp nutmeg (grated or ground)
½ tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt

 

Directions: (makes approx. 24 cookies)
Note - Mix all dry ingredients together first and then add the wet (egg, butter and molasses).  
In a large bowl with mixer at low beat all ingredients together.
Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate dough in bowl for 1 hr.

 

Preheat oven to 350°
Grease cookie sheet with butter
Lightly flour your working surface and your rolling pin…take the dough out (divide dough in half) use first half and then the remaining half.  Roll dough out to be 3/16” thick and punch out your desired shapes and place cookies ½ inch apart on a baking sheet. 

 

Bake for 10 minutes, 12 minutes max. Cool cookies on cookie rack then decorate as desired. 

 

Enjoy!

 

 

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Lest We Forget...

 

November 11th 2018 marks a significant milestone in history…100 years since Armistice Day, the day when armies stopped fighting World War I. King George V held the first Armistice Day at Buckingham Palace in 1919 and 100 years later we continue to commemorate veterans and the war fallen.

 

My grandfather (Hastings & Prince Edward Regiment) is buried in Sicily having lost his life in WWII when my mother was a baby. Having had a stepfather (who was in the Canadian Navy during WWII) and having a father in the military, I have been to my fair share of ceremonies over the years. If you are able to, make the time and take your family to a cenotaph in your neighbourhood. Thank a veteran. And continue to support veterans and active service members for serving our country and making the sacrifices that allow us our freedoms.

 

 "Memoriam eorum retinebimus" (Latin); "We Will Remember Them"

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Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving from Direction Printing!

 

Hoping you enjoy the first over-eating holiday of the season and on that note here are some of the things that our team posted on our chalk wall when asked, “What are you most looking forward to eating at Thanksgiving?

 

- Garlic mashed potatoes with gravy (can't go wrong there unless you're a vampire)

- Turkey - dark meat (yes!)

- Brussel sprouts (guess to each their own...)

- Yorkshire Pudding (nice!)

- A WHOLE pumpkin pie (that's a winning idea!!)

 

What are YOU most looking forward to eating at Thanksgiving?

 

And to our American clients/visitors, guess same question, but you will have to think ahead 1.5 months!

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Printing 101: Holding it all Together – Bindery Basics

 

Welcome to another Printing 101 blog entry - Holding it all Together – Bindery Basics

 

Ever wonder what the best way to bind your project is? There are several different options and it really depends on the type of project/preference and the page count. Here is a breakdown of the most common types of bindery for easy reference and comparison.

 

Saddle Stitching (Stapling) – This is where there are 2 staples put through the stock to hold pages together (sometimes 3, if needed). Great for lower qty page count projects.

 

Pro’s: Inexpensive and fast to produce, project lays relatively flat when open to a page (not so much for higher page counts), adds minimal weight so especially good for mailing, easy to insert into envelopes

Con’s: Limited page count

 

Detailed Spec’s: Minimum 8 pages up to 76-80 pages based on 80lb text weight (increments of 4 pages needed for this bindery type). The max. page count is based on best performance - Add’l pages are also possible, but they cause spine creep (see previous blog entry) and the force of the stitching can sometimes create issues of strain on the cover and the center panels.

 

Perfect Bindery – This is essentially where all your pages are glued together along with a cover that creates a spine for your project.

 

Pro’s: Can accommodate a lot of pages and creates a very professional finished look, easy to insert into envelopes, spine allows for design/text when on a shelf

Con’s: Takes a bit of extra time to produce (1-3 days), projects do not lay flat when open to a page

 

Detailed Spec’s: Minimum 48-52 pages up to 310-330 pages based on 80lb text weight (increments of 2 pages okay for this bindery type). There is standard glue available for shorter term catalogues and a PUR glue, which is much stronger for longer term use catalogues to help insure the pages don’t fall out easily with repeated use.

 

Plastic Coil (Plastikoil) Bindery – This is where a series of holes are punched through collated sheets and then a plastic coil is threaded throughout them and bent on the edges to close up bindery. Available in many colours

 

Pro’s: Can accommodate a lot of pages, colourful options available, project lays flat when open to a page

Con’s: Takes a bit of extra time to produce (1-3 days, depending on qty)

 

Detailed Spec’s: Minimum 20 pages up to 290-310 pages based on 80lb text weight (increments of 2 pages okay for this bindery type). Standard colours are black and white, but there lots of other colours are available (some are special order). A bonus is that this bindery type could be opened up if typos are found on a page so that it can be swapped out (vs. having to reprint the whole project.)

 

Double Loop Wire (Wire-o) Bindery – This is also a method where a series of holes are punched into collated pages and then a metal double loop wire is put in and then pressure closed (squeezed).

 

Pro’s: Can accommodate a lot of pages, project lays flat when open to a page,

Con’s: Takes a bit of extra time to produce (1-3 days, depending on qty)

 

Detailed Spec’s: Minimum 20 pages up to 240-260 pages based on 80lb text weight (increments of 2 pages okay for this bindery type). Black and dull gunmetal or gloss metal are standard. Other colours available, but will be special order. As with plastic coil, this bindery type could be opened up if typos are found on a page so that it can be swapped out (vs. having to reprint the whole project.)

 

Here are some add’l types of bindery available:

 


Corner Stitching (stapled corner) – This is just as it sounds, a staple put into the top corner of a project to hold the pages together. Some projects are done this way for economy or simplicity.

 

Case binding (hardcover) – This is for high-end books or catalogues meant to be kept around for a long-term use. Expensive when compared to other options.

 

Loop stitching – This is sort of a version of saddle stitching that is designed to include a handy loop so that you can put your project into a standard binder (vs. having to do 3-hole drilling).

 

Plastic Comb (Cerlox) – While similar to double loop wire (Wire-o) this type of inexpensive binding is most common in copy shops or educational institutions. Simple to be put together but tends to come apart after a lot of use (as it’s just tension on the loop of plastic and nothing is permanently attached).

 

Feel free to contact us if you’d like to know more about different bindery options and what might work best for your project. We’d be more than happy to provide a sample for your review as well!

 

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Happy Canada Day!

Happy Canada Day from all of us at Direction Printing!

 

If you are entertaining, here is a dynamite veggie dip recipe:

 

“Sure to Please Dip”

3/4 tub sour cream (14%)

Juice of 2 limes

1 jalapeno (or 2 if you want some extra kick!)

1 avocado

1 bunch of green onions

1 large clove of garlic

1/3 of a bunch of fresh cilantro

and ½ tsp salt

 

Throw it all in the bender and its done. Serve with cut veggies and enjoy!

Recommended veggies for dipping: Cucumber/ Snap peas/ Celery/ Carrots/ Kohlrabi/ Peppers etc.

 

We hope everyone has a great and safe Canada Day weekend!

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Weighing in on Paper

 

Welcome to another Printing 101 blog entry - Weighing in on Paper

 

If we are going to talk print, let’s start with a vital basic – PAPER.

 

You’ll find the widest variety of papers available when you are running an offset print project, as the presses have flexibility to handle different thicknesses and coatings.  The presses currently used in digital printing have a more limited tolerance for paper options. 

 

There are four criteria used to grade paper -  weight (thickness), texture, brightness, opacity and the combinations can become overwhelming. If making a paper selection seems like a daunting task, the easiest solution is to request a suitable “house stock” be used for your project.

 

The most essential paper specs to note are the paper weight and whether or not the paper has a coating. 

 

Text Weight – used in applications like the interior pages of a book. Typically measured in pounds (lb. or #)

Cover Weight –used in applications like booklet covers, greeting cards. Typically measured in points (pt.)

 

A list of paper stock recommendations for some commonly run print projects:

 

FLYER 

80lb text to 100lb text

 

BROCHURE

100 lb text

 

POSTCARD

12pt or 14pt cover

 

BUSINESS CARD

14pt or 16pt cover

 

MULTI-PAGE BOOKLETS

80lb text for booklet cover & interior pages

OR

12pt cover weight for booklet cover & 80lb text for interior pages

 

 

PAPER COATINGS:

 

Any paper weight can have a coating applied during the manufacturing process and it will affect the way that inks are absorbed in printing and therefore how colour comes out. These are coatings that are right on the stock, (not to be confused with the additional coatings that can be applied on press during the printing process – that’s another blog topic!)

 

So which coating to choose is largely a creative decision ;) The three most popular coatings are gloss, matte or uncoated.

 

Gloss – adds a reflective shine and makes colours pop.

Matte – adds a subtle silky sheen.

Uncoated – no coating is applied. Inks soak in to the paper and give images a softer look.

 

For the more adventurous print buyer - have a consultation with your Direction Printing Account Rep to discuss the array of paper options and to get samples (always happy to review & share samples!)

 

 

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Printing 101: Flyers vs Brochures vs Booklets?!...Let’s talk about the differences...

Welcome to another Printing 101 blog entry - Today we're going to talk about Flyers vs Brochures vs Booklets and their differences….

 

A Flyer is a single sheet of paper (that doesn’t actually fly ;) or will it?), typically sized to 8.5x11 (can vary slightly larger/smaller) and can be printed on one or both sides. Flyers are best for short term use or quick messages like advertising a particular sale, event upcoming etc. They are most often produced on text weights as that helps to keep the budget in check.

 

Brochures on the other hand are printed on both sides and can be folded in a variety of ways, as shown below. Oh, how I love a good illustration!  Generally, brochures are printed with the intention of being well handled and kept around, so they are best printed on a more durable paper with a protective coating like AQ.  What’s AQ you’re wondering? An abbreviation for aqueous, meaning a water-based coating that helps to prevent finger printing, seal in the ink and speeds up the dry time. AQ ensures your marketing materials get out on time, increases the longevity and look super sharp! 

 

Some cool folds to target your audiences…

 

And last but not least what’s a booklet?!…  booklets are bound containing multiple sheets … an easy rule… if your job doesn’t require binding it’s not considered a booklet to us. They are typically a main marketing tool that’s printed with AQ, using a combination of text and cover weights.... a show piece to be appreciated.


Booklets can be bound using a variety of methods, but most commonly by the use of staples (sometimes referred to as saddle stitched or corner stapling), wire-o binding, plastic coil binding, loop binding or using glues ie perfect binding. There’s a lot to say about booklets....and of course more fun illustrations to add in, so this topic needs to be continued, stay tuned …..

 

To summarize:

Flyers - a flat sheet of paper, printed on one side or two.

Brochures - flat sheet of paper, double sided and folded… there are many folds to consider.

Booklets - multiple sheets bound together, two sided… many binding styles available.

 

:)

Cheers!~

 

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Happy World Graphics Day!

"27 April, Icograda's anniversary, was designated World Graphics Day in 1995. It is an opportunity to recognise communication design and its role in the world.

 

Design shapes our world in every way, affecting our understandings, opinions, actions and decisions. Design determines the impact of information, whether it be through colour, form, or type, including the smallest street sign, the websites we browse, the products we purchase, or the books we read." - ico-d.org

 

http://www.ico-d.org/connect/features/post/295.php for full article

 

We at Direction want to celebrate how design impacts our lives from the packaging that helps you identify ingredients and nutritional information in your food, the signage that guides you on your way to work or even the conundrum created when trying to choose which mustache t-shirt to buy!

 

Hoping everyone can spend 5 seconds thinking about how much design effects their lives on a daily basis!

 

Cheers to all the graphic artists out there working hard!

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How to score a “hole in one” with Colour

 

It’s officially now spring – as a print provider I have golf and colour on my mind.  You can play each hole employing several strokes to get the ball in the cup – or you can figure out how to play in the zone and drop the ball in one stroke. Problem solving on a new client’s project has reminded me of the benefits for adding a Pantone colour to offset print projects and effectively scoring a “hole in one”.

 

A little background on Colour Systems

 

Process

Offset printing creates the illusion of “full colour” using four process inks -  CMYK (Cyan – Magenta – Yellow – Black). Varying amounts of these four primary inks generates the array of colours.

 

Pantone (PMS)

Pantone Matching System (PMS) is a proprietary colour space used in a variety of industries, primarily printing. By standardizing their colours, different manufacturers in different locations can all refer to the Pantone system to make sure colors are consistent. In offset printing, PMS inks offer a tonal range that CMYK inks do not - including specialty inks such as metallics and fluorescents.

 

In the case of our NEW client – they came to us with print samples showing their company logo and their corporate orange was not consistent from project to project or even from page to page within their catalogue. Their corporate/brand identity was something that they considered colour critical and up to the point of meeting us -  it hadn’t been resolved.

 

As a first step, we tested colour swatches in a variety of CMYK combinations and none were quite right. Then we recommended selecting a PMS colour for their logo as it would produce reliable and vibrant results. Our client opted to go this route PMS #1565 and they’re relieved and happy with the predictable results this produces. We scored an ace with our NEW client by solving their colour dilemma.

 

For comparison, here is a scan of the Pantone swatch shown next to the CMYK equivalent:

 

 

 

What’s your favourite colour from the Pantone Spring 2018 collection?

https://www.pantone.com/fashion-color-trend-report-new-york-spring-2018

 

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How To Successfully Choose Brand Colours

 

How To Successfully Choose Brand Colours

 

Are you rebranding in 2019 or choosing brand colours for the first time? Here are 5 things you must consider:

 

1) What emotion will these colours evoke?

 

Every colour drives an emotional response from the viewer. Choose colours based on what you want your audience to feel when looking at your brand.

 

2) Do the colours and brand typography work together?

 

Choose colours and typography that complement each other and provide a similar emotional response.

 

3) How will the colours impact purchasing decisions?

 

Majority of purchasing decisions are based on initial judgments and colour. Make sure your colours bring buyers in quickly and don’t scare them away.

 

4) How does this colour relate to the target audience?

 

While there are similarities in the emotions colours evoke, you can get extremely specific to your target audience and what they are drawn to.

 

5) How do the colours connect to your overall goal?

The colours you choose for your brand should enhance your overall goals and speak to your company’s message.

 

Ready for more tips and colour tool resources? Check out this article: https://www.inkondapaper.com/hidden-in-plain-sight-how-to-choose-your-brands-colors/


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Merry Christmas

Merry Christmas from Direction Printing!

 

From the entire Direction Team we wish you a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

 

Here's a tasty recipe for gingerbread cookies to bring you some holiday cheer!

 

Ingredients:
2 ¼ cups flour
½ cup white sugar
½ cup butter softened
½ cup molasses
1 egg
1 ½ tsp cinnamon
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp ground ginger
½ tsp ground cloves
½ tsp nutmeg (grated or ground)
½ tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt

 

Directions: (makes approx. 24 cookies)
Note - Mix all dry ingredients together first and then add the wet (egg, butter and molasses).  
In a large bowl with mixer at low beat all ingredients together.
Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate dough in bowl for 1 hr.

 

Preheat oven to 350°
Grease cookie sheet with butter
Lightly flour your working surface and your rolling pin…take the dough out (divide dough in half) use first half and then the remaining half.  Roll dough out to be 3/16” thick and punch out your desired shapes and place cookies ½ inch apart on a baking sheet. 

 

Bake for 10 minutes, 12 minutes max. Cool cookies on cookie rack then decorate as desired. 

 

Enjoy!

 

 


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Lest We Forget...

 

November 11th 2018 marks a significant milestone in history…100 years since Armistice Day, the day when armies stopped fighting World War I. King George V held the first Armistice Day at Buckingham Palace in 1919 and 100 years later we continue to commemorate veterans and the war fallen.

 

My grandfather (Hastings & Prince Edward Regiment) is buried in Sicily having lost his life in WWII when my mother was a baby. Having had a stepfather (who was in the Canadian Navy during WWII) and having a father in the military, I have been to my fair share of ceremonies over the years. If you are able to, make the time and take your family to a cenotaph in your neighbourhood. Thank a veteran. And continue to support veterans and active service members for serving our country and making the sacrifices that allow us our freedoms.

 

 "Memoriam eorum retinebimus" (Latin); "We Will Remember Them"


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Happy Thanksgiving!


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Printing 101: Holding it all Together – Bindery Basics

 

Welcome to another Printing 101 blog entry - Holding it all Together – Bindery Basics

 

Ever wonder what the best way to bind your project is? There are several different options and it really depends on the type of project/preference and the page count. Here is a breakdown of the most common types of bindery for easy reference and comparison.

 

Saddle Stitching (Stapling) – This is where there are 2 staples put through the stock to hold pages together (sometimes 3, if needed). Great for lower qty page count projects.

 

Pro’s: Inexpensive and fast to produce, project lays relatively flat when open to a page (not so much for higher page counts), adds minimal weight so especially good for mailing, easy to insert into envelopes

Con’s: Limited page count

 

Detailed Spec’s: Minimum 8 pages up to 76-80 pages based on 80lb text weight (increments of 4 pages needed for this bindery type). The max. page count is based on best performance - Add’l pages are also possible, but they cause spine creep (see previous blog entry) and the force of the stitching can sometimes create issues of strain on the cover and the center panels.

 

Perfect Bindery – This is essentially where all your pages are glued together along with a cover that creates a spine for your project.

 

Pro’s: Can accommodate a lot of pages and creates a very professional finished look, easy to insert into envelopes, spine allows for design/text when on a shelf

Con’s: Takes a bit of extra time to produce (1-3 days), projects do not lay flat when open to a page

 

Detailed Spec’s: Minimum 48-52 pages up to 310-330 pages based on 80lb text weight (increments of 2 pages okay for this bindery type). There is standard glue available for shorter term catalogues and a PUR glue, which is much stronger for longer term use catalogues to help insure the pages don’t fall out easily with repeated use.

 

Plastic Coil (Plastikoil) Bindery – This is where a series of holes are punched through collated sheets and then a plastic coil is threaded throughout them and bent on the edges to close up bindery. Available in many colours

 

Pro’s: Can accommodate a lot of pages, colourful options available, project lays flat when open to a page

Con’s: Takes a bit of extra time to produce (1-3 days, depending on qty)

 

Detailed Spec’s: Minimum 20 pages up to 290-310 pages based on 80lb text weight (increments of 2 pages okay for this bindery type). Standard colours are black and white, but there lots of other colours are available (some are special order). A bonus is that this bindery type could be opened up if typos are found on a page so that it can be swapped out (vs. having to reprint the whole project.)

 

Double Loop Wire (Wire-o) Bindery – This is also a method where a series of holes are punched into collated pages and then a metal double loop wire is put in and then pressure closed (squeezed).

 

Pro’s: Can accommodate a lot of pages, project lays flat when open to a page,

Con’s: Takes a bit of extra time to produce (1-3 days, depending on qty)

 

Detailed Spec’s: Minimum 20 pages up to 240-260 pages based on 80lb text weight (increments of 2 pages okay for this bindery type). Black and dull gunmetal or gloss metal are standard. Other colours available, but will be special order. As with plastic coil, this bindery type could be opened up if typos are found on a page so that it can be swapped out (vs. having to reprint the whole project.)

 

Here are some add’l types of bindery available:

 


Corner Stitching (stapled corner) – This is just as it sounds, a staple put into the top corner of a project to hold the pages together. Some projects are done this way for economy or simplicity.

 

Case binding (hardcover) – This is for high-end books or catalogues meant to be kept around for a long-term use. Expensive when compared to other options.

 

Loop stitching – This is sort of a version of saddle stitching that is designed to include a handy loop so that you can put your project into a standard binder (vs. having to do 3-hole drilling).

 

Plastic Comb (Cerlox) – While similar to double loop wire (Wire-o) this type of inexpensive binding is most common in copy shops or educational institutions. Simple to be put together but tends to come apart after a lot of use (as it’s just tension on the loop of plastic and nothing is permanently attached).

 

Feel free to contact us if you’d like to know more about different bindery options and what might work best for your project. We’d be more than happy to provide a sample for your review as well!

 


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Happy Canada Day!


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Weighing in on Paper

 

Welcome to another Printing 101 blog entry - Weighing in on Paper

 

If we are going to talk print, let’s start with a vital basic – PAPER.

 

You’ll find the widest variety of papers available when you are running an offset print project, as the presses have flexibility to handle different thicknesses and coatings.  The presses currently used in digital printing have a more limited tolerance for paper options. 

 

There are four criteria used to grade paper -  weight (thickness), texture, brightness, opacity and the combinations can become overwhelming. If making a paper selection seems like a daunting task, the easiest solution is to request a suitable “house stock” be used for your project.

 

The most essential paper specs to note are the paper weight and whether or not the paper has a coating. 

 

Text Weight – used in applications like the interior pages of a book. Typically measured in pounds (lb. or #)

Cover Weight –used in applications like booklet covers, greeting cards. Typically measured in points (pt.)

 

A list of paper stock recommendations for some commonly run print projects:

 

FLYER 

80lb text to 100lb text

 

BROCHURE

100 lb text

 

POSTCARD

12pt or 14pt cover

 

BUSINESS CARD

14pt or 16pt cover

 

MULTI-PAGE BOOKLETS

80lb text for booklet cover & interior pages

OR

12pt cover weight for booklet cover & 80lb text for interior pages

 

 

PAPER COATINGS:

 

Any paper weight can have a coating applied during the manufacturing process and it will affect the way that inks are absorbed in printing and therefore how colour comes out. These are coatings that are right on the stock, (not to be confused with the coatings that can be applied on press during the printing process – but that’s another blog topic!)

 

So which coating to choose is largely a creative decision ;) The three most popular coatings are gloss, matte or uncoated.

 

Gloss – adds a reflective shine and makes colours pop.

Matte – adds a subtle silky sheen.

Uncoated – no coating is applied. Inks soak in to the paper and give images a softer look.

 

For the more adventurous print buyer - have a consultation with your Direction Printing Account Rep to discuss the array of paper options and to get samples (always happy to review & share samples!)

 

 


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Printing 101: Flyers vs Brochures vs Booklets?!...Let’s talk about the differences...

Welcome to another Printing 101 blog entry - Today we're going to talk about Flyers vs Brochures vs Booklets and their differences….

 

A Flyer is a single sheet of paper (that doesn’t actually fly ;) or will it?), typically sized to 8.5x11 (can vary slightly larger/smaller) and can be printed on one or both sides. Flyers are best for short term use or quick messages like advertising a particular sale, event upcoming etc. They are most often produced on text weights as that helps to keep the budget in check.

 

Brochures on the other hand are printed on both sides and can be folded in a variety of ways, as shown below. Oh, how I love a good illustration!  Generally, brochures are printed with the intention of being well handled and kept around, so they are best printed on a more durable paper with a protective coating like AQ.  What’s AQ you’re wondering? An abbreviation for aqueous, meaning a water-based coating that helps to prevent finger printing, seal in the ink and speeds up the dry time. AQ ensures your marketing materials get out on time, increases the longevity and look super sharp! 

 

Some cool folds to target your audiences…

 

And last but not least what’s a booklet?!…  booklets are bound containing multiple sheets … an easy rule… if your job doesn’t require binding it’s not considered a booklet to us. They are typically a main marketing tool that’s printed with AQ, using a combination of text and cover weights.... a show piece to be appreciated.


Booklets can be bound using a variety of methods, but most commonly by the use of staples (sometimes referred to as saddle stitched or corner stapling), wire-o binding, plastic coil binding, loop binding or using glues ie perfect binding. There’s a lot to say about booklets....and of course more fun illustrations to add in, so this topic needs to be continued, stay tuned …..

 

To summarize:

Flyers - a flat sheet of paper, printed on one side or two.

Brochures - flat sheet of paper, double sided and folded… there are many folds to consider.

Booklets - multiple sheets bound together, two sided… many binding styles available.

 

:)

Cheers!~

 


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Happy World Graphics Day!


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How to score a “hole in one” with Colour

 

It’s officially now spring – as a print provider I have golf and colour on my mind.  You can play each hole employing several strokes to get the ball in the cup – or you can figure out how to play in the zone and drop the ball in one stroke. Problem solving on a new client’s project has reminded me of the benefits for adding a Pantone colour to offset print projects and effectively scoring a “hole in one”.

 

A little background on Colour Systems

 

Process

Offset printing creates the illusion of “full colour” using four process inks -  CMYK (Cyan – Magenta – Yellow – Black). Varying amounts of these four primary inks generates the array of colours.

 

Pantone (PMS)

Pantone Matching System (PMS) is a proprietary colour space used in a variety of industries, primarily printing. By standardizing their colours, different manufacturers in different locations can all refer to the Pantone system to make sure colors are consistent. In offset printing, PMS inks offer a tonal range that CMYK inks do not - including specialty inks such as metallics and fluorescents.

 

In the case of our NEW client – they came to us with print samples showing their company logo and their corporate orange was not consistent from project to project or even from page to page within their catalogue. Their corporate/brand identity was something that they considered colour critical and up to the point of meeting us -  it hadn’t been resolved.

 

As a first step, we tested colour swatches in a variety of CMYK combinations and none were quite right. Then we recommended selecting a PMS colour for their logo as it would produce reliable and vibrant results. Our client opted to go this route PMS #1565 and they’re relieved and happy with the predictable results this produces. We scored an ace with our NEW client by solving their colour dilemma.

 

For comparison, here is a scan of the Pantone swatch shown next to the CMYK equivalent:

 

 

 

What’s your favourite colour from the Pantone Spring 2018 collection?

https://www.pantone.com/fashion-color-trend-report-new-york-spring-2018

 


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